Read more ...

News from ANTARES and KM3NeT

Despite COVID difficulties, the ARCA junction box and five Detection units (DUs) are ready to be deployed. The deployment vessel will set sail from Malta on April 8 for a week-long sea operation. 

Read more ...

Arriving and leaving

While the shore station at Lake Baikal is filling up more and more with physicists and technicians, the winterovers remaining at the Amundsen-Scott station waved farewell to the last airplane leaving for McMurdo at the Antarctic coast.

Below two pictures from this season’s first excursion to the location of the Baikal ice camp. 

Read more ...

VLVνT 2021

The biannual VLVνT Conference (originally planned as a face-to-face conference in Valencia for autumn 2020) will now be held from 18 to 21 May 2021 as an online meeting.  More information under https://indico.ific.uv.es/event/3965

Read more ...

News from ANTARES and KM3NeT

"Ho Ho Ho", the Christmas gift for KM3NeT has been delivered: the second main electro-optical cable and its power feeding and control system, acquired under the IDMAR project, have been successfully deployed at the Capo Passero KM3NeT-ARCA site close to Sicily.

Read more ...

News from ANTARES

As reported in the August edition of GNN Monthly, one of the ANTARES lines (continuously working since 2007, and the Junction Box to which the line is connected since 2001) failed to communicate with the shore station, so that ANTARES had to continue data taking with only 10 active lines. Since ANTARES will likely be dismantled during 2021, no attempt was planned to repair the fault. However, in November the collaboration could benefit from a sea campaign of the Victor submarine and performed a maintenance operation. Indeed they have been able to reconnect the line to the detector, so ANTARES is again data taking with all 11 lines!

Read more ...

News from Baikal-GVD

The Baikal collaboration is preparing to deploy up to 2 clusters with a total of 288 optical modules on each cluster in the upcoming field season.  While the production is somewhat behind schedule due to Covid-19, Оptical Modules and Control Modules for somewhat more than one cluster have been assembled. Presently, the Control Modules are in long-term testing.

Read more ...

The first optical telescope appeared in 1607 thanks to the Dutch optician and spectacle-maker Johann Lippershey. A bit later, Galileo Galilei upgraded this invention which focuses light (or electromagnetic waves in the optical spectrum) and turned it to the sky: he observed the Moon, its craters and discovered four satellites of Jupiter.

Human abilities were significantly extended through the detection of electromagnetic waves in different length ranges, which resulted in design of new telescopes. And they enabled a great number of discoveries across our Universe.